Frozen Shoulder

Frozen shoulder, also called adhesive capsulitis is a condition characterized by pain and loss of motion in shoulder joint. It is more common in older adults aged between 40 and 60 years and is more common in women than men.

Frozen shoulder, also known as adhesive capsulitis, is a condition characterized by stiffness and pain in the shoulder joint. The condition typically develops slowly, with pain and stiffness increasing over time. The joint’s range of motion becomes progressively more limited, making it difficult to move the arm and perform activities of daily living. Frozen shoulder typically goes through three stages: the freezing stage, the frozen stage, and the thawing stage.

The freezing stage is characterized by the onset of pain and gradual loss of motion. The frozen stage is characterized by pain and stiffness, with little to no improvement in range of motion. The thawing stage is characterized by a gradual improvement in range of motion and decrease in pain.

The exact cause of frozen shoulder is not entirely understood, but it is believed to be caused by the thickening and shrinkage of the capsule that surrounds the shoulder joint. This can be caused by injury or surgery, or it can occur in people with certain medical conditions such as diabetes, thyroid disease or heart disease. It is also common in people who are recovering from a stroke or a surgery on the arm.

Treatment for frozen shoulder typically includes a combination of physical therapy, medication, and in some cases, corticosteroid injections. In some severe cases, surgery may be recommended to release the stiff shoulder capsule. It is important to consult with a medical professional for proper diagnosis and treatment.

The symptoms of frozen shoulder typically develop gradually and can include:

      • Pain in the shoulder, which may be dull or aching and can radiate to the elbow or hand
      • Stiffness in the shoulder, which can make it difficult to move the arm
      • Limited range of motion in the shoulder, making it difficult to perform activities of daily living
      • Weakness in the shoulder and arm
      • A feeling of “catching” or “grinding” in the shoulder joint

The symptoms of frozen shoulder can vary depending on the stage of the condition. In the early freezing stage, pain is the most prominent symptom and motion of the shoulder is gradually restricted. As the condition progresses to the frozen stage, pain may decrease but stiffness and limited range of motion persist. In the thawing stage, the range of motion gradually improves and pain reduces.

It is important to note that these symptoms can also be caused by other conditions such as rotator cuff injuries, arthritis, or nerve impingements. If you are experiencing shoulder pain or stiffness, it is important to consult with a medical professional for proper diagnosis and treatment.

The exact cause of frozen shoulder is not entirely understood, but it is believed to be caused by the thickening and shrinkage of the capsule that surrounds the shoulder joint. This can be caused by several factors, including:

      • Injury or surgery: An injury to the shoulder or surgery on the shoulder, such as a rotator cuff repair, can lead to the development of frozen shoulder.

      • Medical conditions: People with certain medical conditions such as diabetes, thyroid disease, or heart disease are more prone to developing frozen shoulder.

      • Immobilization: People who have had a stroke or surgery on the arm may develop frozen shoulder due to the shoulder being immobilized for an extended period of time.

      • Age: Frozen shoulder is more common in people over 40 years old, and especially in those over 60 years of age.

      • Gender: Frozen shoulder is more common in women than in men

It’s important to note that some cases of frozen shoulder may occur without any obvious cause.

It’s important to consult with a medical professional for proper diagnosis and treatment. A doctor may perform a physical examination, imaging test such as X-ray or MRI, and ask about your medical history to determine the cause of your frozen shoulder and the appropriate course of treatment.

Treatment for frozen shoulder typically includes a combination of physical therapy, medication, and in some cases, corticosteroid injections. The goal of treatment is to reduce pain, improve range of motion, and prevent the condition from progressing. Some common treatment options include:

      • Physical therapy: A physical therapist can work with you to develop an exercise program that will help to improve range of motion, reduce pain and inflammation, and prevent the condition from progressing.

      • Medications: Over-the-counter pain relievers such as ibuprofen and naproxen can help to reduce pain and inflammation. In some cases, a doctor may prescribe stronger pain medication or a muscle relaxant.

      • Corticosteroid injections: Injections of corticosteroids directly into the shoulder joint can help to reduce inflammation and pain.

      • Surgery: In rare cases, surgery may be recommended to release the stiff shoulder capsule. This can be done through arthroscopy (minimally invasive surgery) or open surgery.

      • Heat or cold therapy: Applying heat or cold to the shoulder can help to reduce pain and inflammation.

      • Manual therapy : Like mobilization or manipulation techniques can be used to improve the range of motion.

It’s important to note that recovery time for frozen shoulder can vary depending on the severity of the condition and the treatment chosen. Some people may find relief in a few weeks with proper treatment, while others may take several months to recover. Physical therapy and exercise will be an essential part of the recovery process. It’s important to work closely with a medical professional to develop a treatment plan that is tailored to your specific needs.

Frequently Asked Questions

The foot and ankle in the human body work together to provide balance, stability, movement, and propulsion.

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome is a condition characterized by compression of the ulnar nerve in an area of the elbow called the cubital tunnel.

The arm in the human body is made up of three bones that join together to form a hinge joint called the elbow. The upper arm bone or humerus connects from the shoulder to the elbow forming the top of the hinge joint. The lower arm or forearm consists of two bones, the radius and the ulna. These bones connect the wrist to the elbow forming the bottom portion of the hinge joint.

 

Add Your Comment

Maintained by 8een.co © 2024. All Rights Reserved by Dr Yajuvendra Gawai for Shoulder and Knee Surgeon